Good Architecture

Musings and News from the office of Wayne L. Good. FAIA

Good living, Good food, Good wine and Good Architecture

From the Mosquito Bight Test Kitchen

A few years ago, we visited La Posta Vecchia, a Relais and Chateaux hotel on the Tyrrhenian Sea - just  a short drive from Rome. Chef Michelino Gioia’s recipe for lobster, aubergines, with cold tomato cream is nothing short of genius. Last weekend, I took the recipe into the Mosquito Bight test kitchen and made a faithful test version for lunch in order to understand the basics - that’s my photo above. This recipe is so good that we are adopting it into our Southern Maryland repertoire. Following my concept for the importance of representing place in architectural design, we will regionally adapt the recipe to acknowledge place in gastronomy by substituting the lobster with lump backfin of Chesapeake Bay blue crab once fresh local crab is available. Enjoy!

Happy Memorial weekend.       

Just back from Texas site visit to observe construction progress on our San Antonio project.

Just back from Texas site visit to observe construction progress on our San Antonio project.

“To look at a thing is very different from seeing a thing. One does not see anything until one sees its beauty. Then, and then only, does it come into existence.”  

— Oscar Wilde —

Marking the milestone of 30 years of designing award winning American Homes, Good Architecture, PC will present a salon exhibit of Wayne’s watercolor portfolio - The Importance of Seeing.  We invite you to view the exhibit at the AIAMaryland Gallery in Annapolis, beginning April 14th.  Following the footsteps of centuries of architects before him, Wayne’s plein air paintings feature a series of watercolor studies made on his voyages to the Italian countryside and other destinations. 
AIA Maryland Gallery86 Maryland AvenueAnnapolis, Maryland 21401
Gallery HoursApril 14-18, 201410 AM to 5 PM

“To look at a thing is very different from seeing a thing. One does not see anything until one sees its beauty. Then, and then only, does it come into existence.”  

— Oscar Wilde —

Marking the milestone of 30 years of designing award winning American Homes, Good Architecture, PC will present a salon exhibit of Wayne’s watercolor portfolio - The Importance of Seeing.  We invite you to view the exhibit at the AIAMaryland Gallery in Annapolis, beginning April 14th.  Following the footsteps of centuries of architects before him, Wayne’s plein air paintings feature a series of watercolor studies made on his voyages to the Italian countryside and other destinations. 

AIA Maryland Gallery
86 Maryland Avenue
Annapolis, Maryland 21401

Gallery Hours
April 14-18, 2014
10 AM to 5 PM

Three essential ingredients for Good Architecture
Good living, Good food and Good wine
From the Mosquito Bight Test Kitchen
Roasted beet cubes architecturally stacked on cubes of goat cheese coated with black and white sesame and a drizzle of extra old balsamic. For variety, the sesame can be substituted with curry, black pepper, or sel gris. Or all three.
La Poderina, Rosso Di Montalcino 2010

Three essential ingredients for Good Architecture

Good living, Good food and Good wine

From the Mosquito Bight Test Kitchen

Roasted beet cubes architecturally stacked on cubes of goat cheese coated with black and white sesame and a drizzle of extra old balsamic. For variety, the sesame can be substituted with curry, black pepper, or sel gris. Or all three.

La Poderina, Rosso Di Montalcino 2010

Washington Post Magazine, May 6, 1984

As we reflect upon 30 years of architectural practice, we share one of the first Good Architecture designed (tree)house’s for a very special client.

Washington Post Magazine, May 6, 1984

As we reflect upon 30 years of architectural practice, we share one of the first Good Architecture designed (tree)house’s for a very special client.

A “New” Take on Sustainable Design:
Build Lovable, Durable, Adaptable Houses
Our ancestors built for the ages, and the best of their buildings could last for a thousand years or more. Even everyday houses that line virtually every street regularly lasted for centuries because they could be loved. Most houses today are reduced to the lowest-common-denominator in both design and construction because home builders and architects under pressure from homeowners are forced to prioritize emulation and quantity over quality. If a house is not loved, then chances are it will be demolished and carted off to the landfill in only a generation or two and if the materials are not recycled, all of the embodied energy is lost. Investment in timeless, quality, design and construction can assure that a house will be valued, updated and passed on for generations.

A “New” Take on Sustainable Design:

Build Lovable, Durable, Adaptable Houses

Our ancestors built for the ages, and the best of their buildings could last for a thousand years or more. Even everyday houses that line virtually every street regularly lasted for centuries because they could be loved. Most houses today are reduced to the lowest-common-denominator in both design and construction because home builders and architects under pressure from homeowners are forced to prioritize emulation and quantity over quality. If a house is not loved, then chances are it will be demolished and carted off to the landfill in only a generation or two and if the materials are not recycled, all of the embodied energy is lost. Investment in timeless, quality, design and construction can assure that a house will be valued, updated and passed on for generations.

Good Architecture is a GOOD investment
Good Architecture project makes number 1 on Washington Post’s compilation of top 5 luxury homes sold in Maryland in 2013.
"869 Childs Point Rd., Annapolis $5.9 million The waterfront estate overlooks Crab Creek and the South River. The English Tudor-style home designed by Wayne L. Good, FAIA and built by Smith and Orwig in 1998 is on 9.25 acres with a pool, dock, boathouse, tennis courts, stables and a guest house. Listing agent: Amber Krause, Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty”. - The Washington Post 1/9/2014
This is a perfect example of an all too rare enlightened client with wisdom and vision, who invested in quality architectural design and construction, which resulted in the creation of a truly authentic, timeless, well crafted home that held value in the worst down-market in our lifetime. We hope the new owners truly appreciate what they have acquired.

Good Architecture is a GOOD investment

Good Architecture project makes number 1 on Washington Post’s compilation of top 5 luxury homes sold in Maryland in 2013.

"869 Childs Point Rd., Annapolis $5.9 million
The waterfront estate overlooks Crab Creek and the South River. The English Tudor-style home designed by Wayne L. Good, FAIA and built by Smith and Orwig in 1998 is on 9.25 acres with a pool, dock, boathouse, tennis courts, stables and a guest house. Listing agent: Amber Krause, Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty”. - The Washington Post 1/9/2014

This is a perfect example of an all too rare enlightened client with wisdom and vision, who invested in quality architectural design and construction, which resulted in the creation of a truly authentic, timeless, well crafted home that held value in the worst down-market in our lifetime. We hope the new owners truly appreciate what they have acquired.

“Because I travel a lot, I don’t often have the opportunity to need an architect. But when I do, I go for the best quality possible - and for that I only use Good Architecture in Annapolis, Maryland”
—The Most Interesting Man in the World
“Keep building, my friends.”

“Because I travel a lot, I don’t often have the opportunity to need an architect. But when I do, I go for the best quality possible - and for that I only use Good Architecture in Annapolis, Maryland”

—The Most Interesting Man in the World

“Keep building, my friends.”

Good Architecture makes fortunes come true. Let yours come true in 2014.
All the Best for a Happy New Year

Good Architecture makes fortunes come true. Let yours come true in 2014.

All the Best for a Happy New Year

Transforming a Nearly Destoryed Cheasapeake Island House

In 2003, Hurricane Isabel tracked up Chesapeake Bay bringing high winds, historic flooding and building damage to many low-lying tidewater areas. Located on an island near the mouth of the Potomac River, this 110 year-old iconic waterman’s cottage and out-buildings were flooded and severely damaged.  Although it would have been simpler, faster and more economical to demolish, the clients, who in this case were also the architects, believed that the original structure offered a great character to the island it was decided that the bones of the old cottage were worth saving and re-purposing. Much of the house was constructed using salvaged materials including the attic floor which was from the deck of an old Skipjack.

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Phase One - Completed
After many alternative design studies that would have significantly enlarged the home, it was determined that the simplicity and efficiency of a small cottage was far more desirable than square footage. The design challenge was to maximize architectural aesthetics and functionality within the original building footprint of only 750 square feet to and make
the whole greater than the sum of the parts. The owners, both passionate cooks, desired a professional kitchen that would overlap with dining, entertaining and living functions while not overwhelming the living space - all within a 14 foot by 23 foot plan.

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The house was lifted above the 100-year FEMA flood elevation and fully modernized. Some of the latest energy efficient techniques such as on-demand hot water and a geothermal HVAC system were integrated into the new designs for the old cottage.  Additionally, original exterior siding was salvaged and re-purposed for interior ceilings.

The floor plan was simply reorganized around an axial “alee” from front door to back door, visually extending like an arrow shot through the house to the pier beyond reinforcing spatial separation of kitchen and living functions.

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The kitchen design was inspired by an imaginary Chesapeake Bay “fish camp” cook’s kitchen with functional open shelving. Materials were inspired by classic copper cookware, fabricated of raw steel tubing, stainless steel and copper. In order to keep the lines of the kitchen as visually simple and open as possible, the refrigerator, wall ovens and washer/dryer were located out of sight, in a walk-in pantry.

Phase Two – Construction Beginning 2014 
Because of its proximity to the water, permitting for rebuilding of the outbuilding involved obtaining an absurdly contorted variance to the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area. Connected to the house by an elevated boardwalk, this new outbuilding will complete the project. A “dogtrot” passage will provide a covered entrance and allow the boardwalk to extend the alee axis, pass through the building and connect directly to the owner’s pier. This new structure will accommodate boathouse storage and a small studio. Inspired by the adjustable ventilation of Maryland tobacco barns, siding will be a combination of rain screen and operable louvers to control shading of direct west sun. 

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